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Phoebe reports Friday COVID-19 numbers

From Staff Reports

 

 

ALBANY – As of Friday, August 21, Phoebe Putney Health System (PPHS) reports that a total of 670 patients that have been treated for COVID-19 in its hospitals in Albany, Americus and Worth County have recovered from the virus. However, PPHS also reports that a total of 72 COVID-19 patients are currently being treated in all three of its hospitals.

Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital reports that 57 patients are currently being treated for the virus, while 13 patients are being treated at Phoebe Sumter Medical Center. Phoebe Worth Medical Center is reporting that it has two COVID-19 patients that are currently being treated for the disease.

As far as the number of total positive deaths from COVID-19 is concerned, Phoebe Putney is reporting that a total of 131 COVID-positive deaths have occurred at its hospital, while Phoebe Sumter Medical Center is reporting that a total of 35 COVID-positive deaths have occurred there.

According to the Georgia Department of Public Health (GDPH), in the past two weeks, Sumter County has experienced 276 Coronavirus cases per 100,000 people. The total number of confirmed cases in the county since the pandemic started in March is at 811, while the total number of confirmed cases per 100,000 people in the county since the pandemic started is at 2,759.

The GDPH reports that there have been a total of 56 COVID-related deaths in Sumter County since the beginning of the pandemic and that a total of 180 people have been hospitalized for the virus.

“We know our COVID-19 battle is far from over and healthcare workers throughout Georgia must be steeled for the long road that remains in front of us. Right now, our greatest challenge is staffing, but we are having success filling many critical roles,” said Scott Steiner, PPHS President & CEO. “We hired 91 new nursing graduates over the past 12 months, including 35 who recently completed our unique and innovative Nursing Simulation Training and Education Program (NSTEP).”

Steiner went on to say that NSTEP was designed for new nursing graduates who missed vital clinical training in the spring because of COVID-19. “Our first NSTEP graduates are now at work in their various units where managers are thrilled with their confidence and competence and the quality of care they are providing our patients,” said Steiner.

For updated information on COVID-19, go to www.phoebehealth.com/coronavirus and www.cdc.gov. More information can also be obtained from the Georgia Department of Public Health at its website: www.dph.georgia.gov/ covid-19-daily-status-report.